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Latest Outlook
Outlook Map for 06-2024

June 2024 Hydrological Outlook

Period: From June 2024      Issued on 12.06.2024 using data to the end of May 2024

Rainfall:

May was wetter than average, but with marked variations: most of England was wetter than average (notably so in Wessex, east Anglia and northern areas), along with southern Scotland. In contrast, Northwest Scotland and Northern Ireland were drier than average. The forecast (issued by the Met Office on 27.05.2024) for June favours near-average conditions but indicates that the chance of a wet month is slightly higher than a dry one. The June - August forecast favours near-average conditions, with the chance of a wet or dry summer fairly balanced. 

River flows:

River flows in May were above normal across most of England and southern Scotland, with some exceptionally high flows. Wales, Northern Ireland and parts of Scotland saw normal flows, but flows were below normal in the far northwest of Scotland. The forecast for June is for above normal flows in southeast England, with a likelihood of notably high flows persisting in some catchments. Elsewhere, normal to above normal flows are the most likely outcome. Outlooks suggest below normal flows may persist in northwest Scotland, but early June rainfall makes this less likely. The June – August outlook favours normal to above normal flows across the country, with a chance of above normal flows persisting in parts of the southeast, particularly in groundwater-fed rivers.

Groundwater:

Groundwater levels in May were mostly above normal, and notably or exceptionally high levels were widespread across the country, with a number of new May maxima. The outlook for June is for a continuation of above normal levels across most of the UK, with widespread notably high (and occasionally exceptional) levels, although normal levels are the most likely outcome in some areas of central and northern England. The three-month outlook indicates above normal levels will persist in many areas, but an increasing number of boreholes will see levels entering the normal range.